Sunday, June 2, 2019

Turning Point: The Supreme Court's Creedence in Question

Good Day World!
“...and woe betide anyone foolish enough to question my caffeine intake.” Kieron Gillen

Americans have traditionally accepted the Supreme Court as the guardian of our laws, but that acceptance is rapidly dwindling as the court becomes more politicized and partisan decisions are made.

It's no secret. We have a conservative court that's in bed with The Federalist Society, and GOP lawmakers who see the judges as another extension of their politic power in the senate.

Trump's two appointees, Neil Gorsuch, and Brett Kavanaugh, are perfect examples of infecting the Supreme Court with ideology. Neither would have been confirmed if not for Trump and his GOP minions in the senate.

And both of the new appointees know it. It's safe to say this conspiracy is a blow to democracy.

The court's upcoming decision as to whether the Department of Commerce can add a question about citizenship to our national census, is a major moment with possible historical ramifications.

The true motivation behind the Commerce Department is that Hispanics will be afraid to vote, and it will adversely affect the Democratic Party who count on minority voters. 

Get this, there's new evidence that Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross' decision to add a citizenship question to the census has everything to do with helping Republicans and harming Democrats.

The thing that gets me is the fact that this evidence (and any other that's been collected) will likely not even matter to the Supreme Court.

The Trump administration and it's challengers agree on one thing; adding the citizenship question will reduce the census response rate, especially in immigrant communities.

But when the case was argued in April, the court's conservative majority seem prepared to rule that Ross had acted within his authority to add it, because no method is guaranteed to produce an accurate count.

The fact is the conservative wing of the court has not been particularly concerned about the Voting Rights Act in the past.

For example, six years ago it struck down a key portion of the act designed to protect voters from discriminatory laws. Since then two new conservative members have been appointed by Trump.

Despite what every court in the land has asserted about the question not being lawful, here we are with a conservative majority that could care less about The Voters Right Act.  

The three lower courts ruled against adding the question to the census, but it apparently doesn't matter. It appears the Supreme Court is ready to undermine it's legitimacy by ignoring reality and context and overturning those decisions.

Sadly, we've been reduced to partisan politicians in robes who have no shame, or sense of history.

Time for me to walk on down the road...

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