Dave Stancliff How the U.S. saved a starving Soviet Russia: PBS film highlights Stanford scholar's research on the 1921-23 famine blogarama.com

Saturday, April 30, 2011

How the U.S. saved a starving Soviet Russia: PBS film highlights Stanford scholar's research on the 1921-23 famine

An ARA transport column on the frozen Volga, Tsaritsyn

Photo - An American Relief Administration transport column on the frozen Volga in Tsaritsyn, which is now Volgograd.

The world barely remembers the terrible famine in the Soviet Russia – or the American charity that relieved it. Historian Bertrand Patenaude tells how Herbert Hoover saved more lives than any person who has ever lived.

Shelters for orphaned and abandoned children multiplied across the famine zone during the fall and winter of 1921.

Corn grits, cocoa, condensed milk, white bread and sugar.

This was America's menu for the starving millions in Soviet Russia during the 1921-23 famine – one of the greatest human disasters in Europe since the Black Death. The famine relief was spearheaded by Herbert Hoover, whose biographers credited him with saving more lives than any person who has ever lived.

The story was featured in the PBS "American Experience" documentary, The Great Famine, which aired nationwide on April 11. However, I found a link here that shows it.

An ARA supply caravan on the frozen Volga River in the winter of 1922.

The film is based on Stanford researcher Bertrand Patenaude's The Big Show in Bololand: The American Relief Expedition to Soviet Russia in the Famine of 1921.

Photo Above - Shelters for orphaned and abandoned children multiplied across the famine zone during the fall and winter of 1921.

Photo Right - An ARA supply caravan on the frozen Volga River in the winter of 1922.    All Photos from the Hoover Institute Archives

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