Dave Stancliff Doc pulls tooth from odd spot, Study says ants could save world, & a Pokémon-playing fish blogarama.com

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Doc pulls tooth from odd spot, Study says ants could save world, & a Pokémon-playing fish

A tooth seen inside a man's nose.

Good Day World!

In my ongoing search for interesting stories I’ve selected a trio today that might make your day.

You may even want to tweet these articles to start a conversation about odd news.

We live in an interesting world where mysteries abound and things strange things happen on a daily basis.

TODAY’S OFFERINGS

After suffering from nosebleeds once or twice a month for three years, the 22-year-old man in Saudi Arabia consulted a doctor, who found an ivory-white, bony mass, about half an inch (1 centimeter) long in the man's nose.

 The doctors then consulted with dentist colleagues, who concluded that the mass was actually an extra tooth that had somehow ended up growing in his nose, according to the report.

The doctors pulled out the extra tooth after putting the man under general anesthesia, and the patient completely healed, and had no more nosebleeds three months later, according to the report, published in July in the American Journal of Case Reports.

Can Ants Save the World from Climate Change?

Ants may be some of Earth's most powerful biological climate brokers, a provocative new study claims.

The average ant lives and dies in less than a year, but a long-term experiment tracking the insects' effects on soil suggests they cooled Earth's climate as their numbers grew.

(Photo: Some plants supply nectar to ants in return for protection from herbivores. Here a Dolichoderus ant feeds from nectar)

Related: Image Gallery: Ants of the World

Live-stream Shows Nothing But a Fish Playing Pokémon, and It's a Huge Hit

Behold, "Fish Plays Pokémon."

It pretty much works as the title advertises: A Siamese fighting fish named Grayson swims around in a tank, and its up, down, right, and left movements trigger commands for the main character in the first iteration of the Nintendo game, Pokémon Blue.

Two students, Catherine Moresco and Patrick Facheris, at the University of Chicago and Columbia University, respectively, put together the setup as part of the hackNY 2014 fellowship program.

The live-stream has a massive audience on Twitch, and it routinely has an audience of 20,000 or more viewers online. It's not the first time Twitch has been used in an innovative way. 'Twitch Plays Pokemon' is a collaborative stream that allows participants to enter commands into a chat box. (Full story here)

Time for me to walk on down the road…

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