Dave Stancliff Pretty Soon You Won’t Be Able to Use Air Because It Belongs to the Federal Government blogarama.com

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Pretty Soon You Won’t Be Able to Use Air Because It Belongs to the Federal Government

                                                Good Day World!

I can understand the anger over our Federal Government which routinely ignores what most Americans want.

States are stripped of their sovereignty with regularity. Voters can vote to legalize marijuana at the state level, but the feds refuse to stop harassing the pot providers and people who buy it.

Since Barack Obama came into office, the assault on state’s rights has been constant. I remember when he ran for office and said he would respect the rights of voters who legalized pot at the state level. That was pure bullshit. His actions say otherwise.

In the relentless war on marijuana the feds keep imposing new ways to harass marijuana dispensaries, growers, and users/patients. Here’s the most recent example:

Marijuana growers operating legally in Colorado and Washington state took another hit from the federal government on Tuesday when the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced that pot growers are (still) not allowed to use federal irrigation waters according to an NBC news report.

On Tuesday, in what's called a "temporary policy" decision, the bureau reiterated that federal law still rules.

"Reclamation will operate its facilities and administer its water-related contracts in a manner that is consistent with the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, as amended. This includes locations where state law has decriminalized or authorized the cultivation of marijuana. Reclamation will refer any inconsistent uses of federal resources of which it becomes aware to the Department of Justice and coordinate with the proper enforcement authorities," it said.

That last line means that the bureau won't actually be enforcing the law so much as letting the Justice Department know when it believes marijuana growers are using federal water.

The decision is termed "temporary" because a permanent policy decision would require a lengthy process that includes public hearings. The government wants to avoid any high profile battle so they’re taking this sneak-around approach.

In a statement to NBC News, Justice Department spokeswoman Ellen Canale said, "The Department of Justice will continue to enforce the Controlled Substances Act and will focus federal resources on the most significant threats to our communities. Our efforts will be guided by the eight factors set forth in the August 29, 2013 guidance memorandum."

Here’s those eight factors (PDF)

Meanwhile, many in the burgeoning legal marijuana industry saw Tuesday's announcement as more of the same in terms of federal harassment for something that is sanctioned at the local level.

Time for me to walk on down the road…

 

No comments: