Dave Stancliff Happy New Year! History and Traditions Through the Ages blogarama.com

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Happy New Year! History and Traditions Through the Ages

new-years-day-2013 (5)

                                      Good Day World!

Happy New Year!

Civilizations around the world have been celebrating the start of each new year for at least four millennia.

Ancient Babylonians first celebrated the new year over 4,000 years ago. Check out this video history of New Year's Eve.

Today, most New Year’s festivities begin on December 31 (New Year’s Eve), the last day of the Gregorian calendar, and continue into the early hours of January 1 (New Year’s Day).

Common traditions include attending parties, eating special New Year’s foods, making resolutions for the new year and watching fireworks displays.

In many countries, New Year’s celebrations begin on the evening of December 31—New Year’s Eve—and continue into the early hours of January 1.

Revelers often enjoy meals and snacks thought to bestow good luck for the coming year. In Spain and several other Spanish-speaking countries, people bolt down a dozen grapes-symbolizing their hopes for the months ahead-right before midnight.

In many parts of the world, traditional New Year’s dishes feature legumes, which are thought to resemble coins and herald future financial success; examples include lentils in Italy and black-eyed peas in the southern United States.

Because pigs represent progress and prosperity in some cultures, pork appears on the New Year’s Eve table in Cuba, Austria, Hungary, Portugal and other countries. Ring-shaped cakes and pastries, a sign that the year has come full circle, round out the feast in the Netherlands, Mexico, Greece and elsewhere.

In Sweden and Norway, meanwhile, rice pudding with an almond hidden inside is served on New Year’s Eve; it is said that whoever finds the nut can expect 12 months of good fortune. (source)

Time for me to walk on down the road…

 

 

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