Dave Stancliff 2014-11-02 blogarama.com

Monday, November 3, 2014

Alert! Blog Break: Publisher Says It’s Only Temporary

Good Day World!

Time for a blog break.

I find it refreshing. And necessary.

In this age of technology, I think it’s a good idea to unplug occasionally. I turn off my PC, the TV, and take a break from everything virtual.

I’ll actually do everything in real time for the next week. 

From November 4th through the 11th, I’ll be wandering the hinterlands with my honey. If all goes well, my next post will be on the 12th.

Here’s an election day story for you: Bush, Kennedy and more: 5 political dynasties to watch Election Day

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Since I’ll be gone on Veterans Day, I’m going to give a shout-out right now to my fellow veterans; “Peace!”

I want to thank you, valued viewer, for stopping by this blog.

Take a minute, and check out the links on the right side of this page.

You’ll find newspaper columns I wrote, and all of my past posts (going back to July 2005), a link to my novella RAFTER’S REDEMPTION, and a link to an ongoing book project – THE JET CHRONICLES.

I hope you come back to visit again soon. Have a good one!

Time for me to walk on down the road…

The life which is unexamined is not worth living.” - Plato

 

 

 

Sunday, November 2, 2014

How to create awesome glazes for your precious pottery

Good Day World!

It’s time to get glazed…but not confused!

I put together a learning board on glazing pottery last year that was really popular with viewers (still is) while working at Learnist.

It’s titled Awesome Glazes for Pottery.

Glazing is important for earthenware vessels. Without it they wouldn't hold liquids due to porosity. Glaze is also used on stoneware and porcelain.

Check out the links and information on glazing origins, art, applications, techniques and how to apply it like a pro.

According to this Wikipedia article, from 552 to 794 AD, different colored glazes were introduced during the Kofun period of Japan.

The earliest example, Sue ware, was decorated with natural ash glazes and were green. In the 13th century, flower designs were painted with red, blue, green, yellow and black overglazes.

Learn about bisque firing, baking and glazing your pottery creations at Howstuffworks.

Using glazes requires a lot of experimentation and practice. Many factors, like the kind of kiln or the kind of clay you use, impact the final result.

Above all, have fun!

Time for me to walk on down the road…