Dave Stancliff Aldous Huxley: a man not afraid of taking long journeys blogarama.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Aldous Huxley: a man not afraid of taking long journeys

 Good Day Humboldt County!

 I thought it would be interesting to take a brief look at a man who enjoyed getting high, and who was a visionary second to none.

If you’ve ever read any of his writings you’ll know he’s deep. He was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist, and he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. Now it’s time to meet: 

Aldous Leonard Huxley who was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. Best known for his novels including Brave New World and a wide-ranging output of essays. He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics.

Huxley also edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories, poetry, travel writing, film stories and scripts. Huxley spent the later part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death.

By the end of his life Huxley was widely recognized to be one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time and respected as an important researcher into visual communication and sight-related theories as well.

Huxley once said:

“There will be, in the next generation or so, a pharmacological method of making people love their servitude, and producing dictatorship without tears, so to speak, producing a kind of painless concentration camp for entire societies, so that people will in fact have their liberties taken away from them, but will rather enjoy it, because they will be distracted from any desire to rebel by propaganda or brainwashing, or brainwashing enhanced by pharmacological methods. And this seems to be the final revolution.”

Sound familiar? Kinda scary isn’t it? It certainly gives you food for thought…

Time for me to walk on down the road…

1 comment:

Brandt Hardin said...

Huxley is turning in his grave nearly 100 years after his visionary prophecies began to form into his own mode of fiction. He is one of my favorite authors and raised serious issues and made world-wide breakthroughs in the research of psychedelics as well as our cognitive liberties. I drew a portrait as homage to the man and his works. See the him roll with the mushrooms, the pills and the doors of perception at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2010/07/aldous-huxley-rolls-in-his-grave.html