Dave Stancliff USPS tries to surpress research paper that shows its mail processing centers closures will not save money blogarama.com

Thursday, March 15, 2012

USPS tries to surpress research paper that shows its mail processing centers closures will not save money

                  Good Day Humboldt County!

It’s just as I suspected – the Post Office’s claims that shutting down mail processing plants will save money – is bogus! Research is starting to trump rhetoric, but the USPS is not giving up without a fight.

The USPS supposedly lost a research paper that would have exposed the fact that there were no calculations on lost volume, and revenues in the decision process to shut down the mail processing centers.

I know one thing, no one will ever be able to convince me that when I send a letter to someone local and it’s re-routed to Medford, Oregon, it’s going to be a cost-saving measure! Anyone with a dose of common sense can see that the USPS is trying to pull a fast one, while slowing down service!

Snippet: 

“The Postal Service’s Big Hurry to consolidate 223 mail processing plants may be running into serious speed bumps.  The AMP studies don’t add up to anything like what the Postal Service says it will save nor do they reveal where most of the 35,000 eliminated positions will come from.

Now there’s news of a market research study on potential revenue losses the downsizing initiatives may cause that the Postal Service chose not to tell anyone about — and that it still wants to keep under wraps.

News of this other research was first revealed back in February, in testimony by one of the Postal Service witnesses for the Advisory Opinion on the Network Rationalization plan being conducted by the Postal Regulatory Commission.  Last week the Postal Service gave the PRC the data from this market research, along with a request to keep the materials “non-public.”  The Postal Service is also saying that because the research was “abandoned” before completion, there are no calculations on lost volume and revenues to look at.That's not sitting well with the participants in the Advisory Opinion process, and we're going to be hearing a lot more about this missing market research study.  Next week, witnesses for the Postal Service will be cross-examined before the Commissioners, and the market survey is sure to come up.”

Go here to read the entire article.

Time for me to walk on down the road…

No comments: