Dave Stancliff Feds provide pot in decades-old program, teen murder suspect says she’s a vampire, and FBI catches militant fugitive from the 70s blogarama.com

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Feds provide pot in decades-old program, teen murder suspect says she’s a vampire, and FBI catches militant fugitive from the 70s

Image: Elvy Musikka, 72, who suffers from glaucoma, lights a marijuana cigarette

        Good Morning Humboldt County!

Grab a cup of coffee and join me this morning in scanning a few stories to start the day. It’s another day in paradise and the weather looks to be beautiful again.

For your reading pleasure I have:

In decades-old program, Uncle Sam provides pot

For the past three decades, Uncle Sam has been providing a handful of patients with some of the highest grade marijuana around. The program grew out of a 1976 court settlement that created the country's first legal pot smoker.

Photo - Elvy Musikka relies on the pot to keep her glaucoma under control. She entered the program in 1988, and said that her experience with marijuana is proof that it works as a medicine.

Advocates for legalizing marijuana or treating it as a medicine say the program is a glaring contradiction in the nation's 40-year war on drugs — maintaining the federal ban on pot while at the same time supplying it.

Government officials say there is no contradiction. The program is no longer accepting new patients, and public health authorities have concluded that there was no scientific value to it, Steven Gust of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse told The Associated Press. At one point, 14 people were getting government pot. Now, there are four left.

Stephanie Pistey thinks she’s a vampire and part werewolf …

Fla. teen murder suspect says she's a vampire

Last week, police in Parker, Fla., claimed the people involved in the July murder of 16-year-old Jacob Hendershot may have been involved in a vampire cult. Now one of the suspects is confirming that information. Stephanie Pistey, 18, was arrested last Monday and was charged with accessory to murder.

She says she believes she's a vampire. Parker Police originally believed Hendershot was beaten to death because Stephanie Pistey accused him of raping her. "Jacob didn't deserve to die. I didn't even know he was going to die, but I honestly knew that they were going to beat him up and in my opinion he deserved to get the s*** beat out of him. He didn't deserve to die," Pistey said in an interview Monday. Investigators say a group of Pistey's friends lured Herndershot to a house, killed him, then dumped his body in a concrete enclosure.

George Wright

For decades, NJ fugitive enjoyed idyllic life in Portugal

A 1970s militant who carried out one of the most brazen hijackings in U.S. history lived for decades in an idyllic Portuguese hamlet near a stunning beach with his Portuguese wife and two children, his neighbors said Wednesday.

George Wright, 68, worked odd jobs around Almocageme, 28 miles west of Lisbon, most recently employed as a nightclub bouncer, said two neighbors who spoke on condition of anonymity because they feared being ostracized for speaking out.

Wright, taken into custody Monday at the request of the U.S. government , also spoke very good Portuguese, they said, adding that his children were now in their 20s. Wright used the alias of Jose Luis Jorge dos Santos, U.S. officials said, and townspeople in Almocageme knew him as "Jorge" and "George."

Wright was convicted of the 1962 murder of gas station owner Walter Patterson, a decorated World War II veteran who was shot during a robbery at his business in Wall, New Jersey. Eight years into his 15- to 30-year prison term, Wright and three other men escaped from the Bayside State Prison farm in Leesburg, New Jersey, on Aug. 19, 1970. The FBI said Wright became affiliated with an underground militant group, the Black Liberation Army, and lived in a "communal family" with several of its members in Detroit.

In 1972, Wright — dressed as a priest and using an alias — hijacked a Delta flight from Detroit to Miami with four other BLA members and three children, including Wright's companion and their 2-year-old daughter.

Time to walk on down the road…

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