Dave Stancliff Dolphins eat fish using conch shells, town mints it’s own money, and the Pentagon pays $720 million in late fees for storage containers blogarama.com

Monday, August 29, 2011

Dolphins eat fish using conch shells, town mints it’s own money, and the Pentagon pays $720 million in late fees for storage containers

Good Morning Humboldt County!

It’s that time again. Grab a chair and have a nice steaming cup of virtual coffee with me. I’m wondering if Hurricane Irene was overblown? What do you think? Meanwhile, let’s take a look at: 

Fish-catching trick may be spreading among dolphins

Dolphins in one western Australian population have been observed holding a large conch shell in their beaks and using it to shake a fish into their mouths -- and the behavior may be spreading.                                                         photo source

Researchers from Murdoch University in Perth were not quite sure what they were seeing when they first photographed the activity, in 2007, in which dolphins would shake conch shells at the surface of the ocean.

Mayor Luca Sellari displays Filettino's own bank currency, the "Fiorito", at his office in Filettino, 70 km (43 miles) east of Rome August 29, 2011. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

Town mints own money to fight austerity

A small town in central Italy is trying to go independent and mint its own money in protest at government austerity cuts.

Filettino, set in rugged hill country around 100 km (65 miles) east of Rome, is rebelling against a proposal to merge the governments of towns with fewer than 1,000 inhabitants to save money.

Mayor Luca Sellari displays Filettino's own bank currency, the "Fiorito."

Filettino has only around 550 people.

Pentagon pays $720M in late fees for storage containers

The Pentagon has spent more than $720million since 2001 on fees for shipping containers that it fails to return on time, according to data and contracts obtained by USA TODAY.

The cost stems from the mistaken belief that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq would be brief and late fees would be minimal, said John Pike executive director of Globalsecurity.org, a defense policy group.

"This is real money," Pike said. "And we've spent a lot of it on what amounts to fines for overdue library books."

Time to walk on down the road…

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