Dave Stancliff Would you give up the internet for $1 million? Check out Big Fat Whale site, and NFL lockout over blogarama.com

Monday, July 25, 2011

Would you give up the internet for $1 million? Check out Big Fat Whale site, and NFL lockout over

Informal study says most people wouldn’t give up the internet for just $1 million…

Good Morning Humboldt County!

It’s time to get comfortable, sip some virtual coffee, and see what what the world is up to. A big week lies ahead as our dysfunctional government tries to balance the budget.

Would you give up the Internet for $1 million?

A not-very-scientific poll by the Fund for American Studies finds the answer to be "no" for two reasons: One, the dollar payoff isn't big enough (!) and two, the Internet has become so key that no amount of money would cover the loss of its place in our lives.

Big Fat Whale Site Profile

Big Fat Whale Site Profile

Big Fat Whale is a subversive comic by Brian McFadden. McFadden's weekly strips usually deal with politics, commercialization run amuck, and stupidity. The style is non-narrative, usually favoring single-panel gags dealing with a subject like "fatty foods of the future" or "how to opt in to your rights".

Best of "Big Fat Whale":The Metric Resistance -The World's Worst Web Ads -Future Stars of the GOP - Crap-ass Valentines - Internet Anti-Memes and Non-Sensations - 25 Cent Book Bin - Ineffective Public Service Announcements

NFL, players set on terms of deal

NFL owners and players agreed early Monday to the terms of a deal to end the lockout, and players were expected to begin their voting process later in the day, two people familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press.

FILE - This Feb. 6, 2011, file photo shows Green Bay Packers' Nick Collins (36) celebrating with teammate Clay Matthews (52) after returning an interception for a touchdown during the first quarter of the NFL football Super Bowl XLV game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, in Arlington, Texas. NFL owners and players agreed early Monday, July 25, 2011 to the terms of a deal to end the lockout, and players were expected to begin the voting process later in the day, two people familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the process was supposed to remain secret and no formal announcement had been made. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the process was supposed to remain secret and no formal announcement had been made.

The NFL Players Association's executive committee was to meet at its headquarters in Washington on Monday so it could be presented with the finalized agreement. NFLPA president Kevin Mawae arrived shortly after 9:30 a.m.

Time to walk on down the road…

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